Gwalior, Madhya Pradesh

Geography of Gwalior, Madhya Pradesh

Gwalior district is one of the of Madhya Pradesh state in Central india. The historic city of Gwalior is its 50 districts administrative headquarters. Other cities and towns in this district are Antari, Bhitarwar, Bilaua, Dabra, Morar Cantonment, Pichhore, and Tekanpur. The district has an area of 5,214 km², and a population 2,030,543 (2011 census). Gwalior District is bounded by the districts of Bhind to the northeast, Datia to the east, Shivpuri to the south, Sheopur to the east, and Morena to the northwest. The district is part of Gwalior Division. Gwalior is also known for 1857 revolt and Rani Lakshmi Bai's heroic resistance. After Kalpi (Jhansi) fell into the hands of the British on May 24, 1858, Lakshmibai sought shelter at the Gwalior fort. Afraid of the British, The king of Gwalior was not willing to give up his fort but his soldiers laid down their arms in respect for the Rani of Jhansi. Thus the freedom fighters entered Gwalior without a fight. The British wasted no time in attacking Gwalior. It was the fiercest, bloodiest battle ever fought on Indian soil. Lakshmibai's courage, strength, and ability as she valiantly fought the British army's vastly superior forces, are remembered to this day. Gwalior was captured and the real heroism of Rani Laxmibai reached to the heights when died fighting courageously.

Location & Geographical Area : Gwalior is located on the periphery of Madhya Pradesh State, 321 Kms (199.5 Miles) from Delhi and 121 Kms (76 Miles) from Agra. The total geographical area of the district is 5, 21,400 Hectare. In the summer season the climate is very hot, the shade temperature rising frequently to 112 F., but in the winter months (from November to February inclusive) it is usually temperate and for short periods extremely cold.

map of gwalior

Topography :

The district is at the center of the Gird region, and is mostly a relatively level plain. This plain, though broken in its southern portion by low hills, has generally an elevation of only a few hundred feet above sea-level. Gwalior is located at 26.22 N 78.18 E. It has an average elevation of 197 metres (646 feet).

FOREST : Total forest area of the district is 1, 9,200 Hectare.

Large Scale Industries / Public Sector undertakings -
List of the units in Gwalior & near by Area
1. Railway Spring karkhana, Shitholi
Major Exportable Item
1/ Polished and crafted stones
2/ Transformers components

Growth Trend : 5-6%

Vendorisation / Ancillarisation of the Industry:
Following manufacturing sectors have been registered as vendor/suppliers to Railway,
BHEL, and Crompton Greaves & BSF:
1/ Transformers and allied products cluster enterprises.
2/ Engineering enterprises.

Medium Scale Enterprises - List of the units in Gwalior & near by Area
1. Unipatch Rubber Limited, Maharajpura Gwalior
2. Gwalior Sugar Company Limited, Dabra
3. J.B. Mangharam Foods Limited , Gwalior
4. Hindustan Vidyut product Pvt. Ltd. Gwalior
5. Taxhishila Textile Pvt. Ltd. Gwalior
6. Harshit Textile Pvt. Ltd. Gwalior
7. Adityaz hotel Limited, Gwalior
8. Raj Event & entertainment Pvt. Ltd. Gwalior
9. Gwalior Distillers Ltd.
10. Surya Roshni Ltd. Maharajpura Gwalior

Major Exportable Item -
Tyre and tubes repairing materials (Unipatch Rubber Ltd.)

Service Enterprises -
There are 210 service enterprises existing in the district.

Potential areas for service industry -
1/ Tourism services
2/ Software development
3/ Events management services
4/ Data processing
5/ BPO
6/ Repairing & servicing of medical equipments
7/ Advertisement/publicity centre
8/ Equipment/ machinery rental services
9/ Common testing centre
10/ Technical consultancy services
11/ Herbs collection centre

Potential for new MSMEs -
1/ Drugs and pharmaceutical
2/ Herbal processing
3/ Precision Machining and fabrication
4/ Chemicals processing
5/ Stone processing
6/ Food processing

By Air -
Gwalior City has its own international airport called Rajmata Vijaya Raje Scindia Air Terminal. 
Flights from all the major Indian cities connect the city to other parts of the country.

By Rail -
Gwalior railway station is conveniently located on the Delhi-Mumbai and Delhi-Chennai rail link. Among major trains, the Taj and Shatabdi Express connect Gwalior with Delhi and Agra.

By Road -
Gwalior is well connected by a good road network connecting all the major places in Madhya Pradesh and the surrounding areas. Gwalior is well linked with Agra (118 km), Jaipur (350 km), Delhi (321 km), Lucknow, Bhopal (423 km), Chanderi (239 km), Indore (486 km), Jhansi (101 km), Khajuraho (275 km), Ujjain (455 km), and Shivpuri (114 km).
Distance to Gwalior

  • From delhi - 321 KM
  • From mumbai - 1086 KM
  • From ahmedabad - 858 KM
  • From kolkata - 1248 KM
  • From kanpur - 276 KM
  • From jaipur - 350 KM

Local transport :
Gwalior's public transport system mainly consists of Tempos, auto rickshaw taxis, and micro-buses. Municipal Corporation's "Gwalior City Bus" covers some routes in the city. BlueRadio taxis are also available in Gwalior. The Tempos and auto rickshaws are often cited as a cause of pollution and road congestion, and the local government has plans to replace the Tempos with vans that will run on liquefied petroleum gas. The 35km cycle track in Gwalior Recently, a 35 km cycle track has been built in the city, and the city became the fourth in India to have this type of facility.

Culture of Gwalior, Madhya Pradesh

Art and culture

Gwalior is a well acknowledged place of art, associated with historic as well as contemporary evidence. In August 2005 a mural created by Aasutosh Panigrahi and five other artists was acknowledged as the World's Largest Indoor Mural by Guinness World Records.

Marathi Sahitya Sammelan, the conference on Marathi Literature were held once in Gwalior City. It was presided by President of the Conference writer Kusumavati Deshpande (and wife of Kavi Anil) in 1961. She was the first female president of the annual Sammelan since its inception in 1878.

Culturally Gwalior is the confluence of two rich cultures Bundeli and Braj. Bundelkhand covers Gwalior, Bhind, Morena, Sagar, Shivpuri, Guna, Sheopur and adjoining areas.

Music:

Tansen, born in Behat, trained in music at Vrindavan, served Raja Ramchandra Waghela of Bandhawgarh, then went to Agra under the patronage of Akbar. After the death of Tansen in Fatehpur Sikri and cremation in Agra, his ashes were buried in Gwalior. Tansen Samaroh is held every year in Gwalior. Sarod maestro Ustad Amjad Ali Khan is also from the royal city of Gwalior. His grandfather, Ghulam Ali Khan Bangash, became a court musician in Gwalior.

Gwalior holds an unparalleled reputation in Sangeet. Baijnath Prasad (alias Baiju Bawra) was a classical singer (Dhrupadiya) who lived in Gwalior for his whole life under the patronage of Man Singh. Baiju was born in Chanderi and was cremated there. He received his musical training in Brindaban under Swami Guru Haridas Ji. He was the court musician of Gwalior along with Nayak Charju, Bakshu, and others.

Gwalior Gharana -

The Gwalior Gharana is one of the oldest Khayal Gharanas and one to which most classical Indian musicians can trace the origin of their style. The rise of the Gwalior Gharana started with the reign of the great Mughal emperor Akbar (1542–1605). The favourite singers of this patron of the arts, such as Miyan Tansen, first amongst the vocalists at the court, came from the town of Gwalior. Gwalior has an important role in the journey of music in India, so much that every year, the Tansen Festival is celebrated at the tomb of Tansen in Gwalior.

Dhrupad -

Dhrupad (Hindi: ध्रुपद) is a vocal genre in Hindustani classical music, said to be the oldest still in use in that musical tradition. Its name is derived from the words "dhruva" (fixed) and "pada" (words). The term may denote both the verse form of the poetry and the style in which it is sung. Raja Man Singh Tomar, the King of Gwalior between 1486–1516 AD, was a patron of Dhrupad.

Tansen Sangeet Samaroh -

The famous Tansen Sangeet Samaroh, or the Tansen Music Festival, is celebrated every year on the Tansen Tomb in Gwalior. Tansen Samaroh is a platform where artists from all over India gather and participate to deliver vocal and instrumental performances. Gwalior's environment during the festival turns mystical with melodious music echoing. Music lovers from far and wide make it a point to be a part of this event at any cost, as it is a memorable experience for them. The Tansen Sangeet Samaroh is organised by the government of MP, in association with the Academy of the department of culture in MP. During the festival, music lovers and artists from all over the world gather to offer their bit of tribute to the all-time music Maestro Tansen. To date, this festival has the honour of being the only musical show in Gwalior that takes place on multiple days and nights. The academy offers honours to senior celebrities and junior artists by including them in the Samaroh through their music of performance. Tansen was a singer of Akbar’s mughal court. An exponent of the Hindustani classical music's dhrupad style, he was counted among the Nine Jewels of the Royal Court. In remembrance of this artist there is a tomb constructed in Gwalior called the Tansen Tomb. This is where the Tansen Music Festival or the Tansen Samaroh is organised every year. This annual music festival started in the 1930s. At present, artists from all over the country come to perform. The venue Gwalior has retained Indian traditions and the wealth of music intact over the years.

The Tansen Music Festival, or Tansen Samaroh, is held every year in the month of December.

Main festivals

All national festivals, Holi, Diwali, Mahashivratri, Shri Krishna Janmashtami, Ramnavami, Makara Sankranti, Eid-ul-Fitr, Christmas, Rakshabandhan, Mahavir jayanti, Hanuman jayanti, Buddha Poornima,Guru Nanak Jayanti, Sant Ravidas and Ghasiram Jayanti and other local ones such as Nag-Panchmi, Shreenath Mahadji Maharaj Punyatithi, Gangaur, Teej, Gudi Padwa (Marathi New Year), Navratri, Durga Puja are celebrated with equal enthusiasm. Last decade has seen a rise in the celebration of events supklikp Gwalior also celebrates Rang Panchami quite differently. This festival is celebrated five days after Dulendi or Holi. This is also celebrated like Dulendi, but colours are mixed with water and then either sprinkled or poured on others.

Durga Puja

A Glimpse of Bengal can be seen in the City of Gwalior, as the Birlanagar Durga Puja committee celebrate the Durga Puja every year . They completed 58 years of celebration in 2013. This puja is hosted by Bengali Cultural Association and School , Birla Nagar , Gwalior. During the Durga puja celebrations several cultural events are organized and is celebrated on a large scale. Thousands of people daily visits the puja pandal to get the blessings of Goddess Durga.

Makar Sankranti is a 'Kite Festival' on 14 January each year, where people fly kites and compete to cut each other's kites in the sky.

Cuisine of Gwalior, Madhya Pradesh

Places of interest in Gwalior, Madhya Pradesh

The Fort :
Standing on a steep mass of sandstone, Gwalior Fort dominates the city and is its most significant monument. It has been the scene of momentous events, imprisonment, battles and jauhars . A steep road winds upwards to the fort, flanked by statues of the Jain tirthankaras, carved into the rock face. The magnificent outer walls of the fort still stand, two miles in length and 35 feet high, bearing witness to its reputation for being one of the most invincible forts of India. This imposing structure inspired Emperor Babur to describe it as " the pearl amongst the fortresses of Hind ".

Gujari Mahal :
Within the fort are some marvels of medieval architecture. The 15th century Gujari Mahal is a monument to the love of Raja Mansingh Tomar for his intrepid Gujar Queen, Mrignayani. The outer structure of Gujari Mahal has survived in an almost total state of preservation; the interior has been converted into Archaeological Museum housing rare antiquities,some of them dating back to the 1st century A.D. Even though many of these have been defaced by the iconoclastic Mughals , their perfection of form has survived the ravages of time. Particularly worth seeing is the statue of Shalbhanjika from Gyraspur, the tree goddess, the epitome of perfection in miniature . The statue is kept in the custody of the museum's curator, and can be seen on request.

Man Mandir Palace :
Built between 1486 and 1517 by Raja Mansingh.The tiles that once adorned its exterior have not survived , but at the entrance , traces of these still remain. Within the palace rooms stand bare, stripped of their former glory, testifying to the passing of the centuries. Vast chambers with fine stone screens were once the music halls, and behind these screens, the royal ladies would learn music from the great masters of the day. Below, circular dungeons housed the state prisoners of the Mughals. Emperor Aurangzeb had his brother , Murad imprisoned , and later executed here. Close by is Jauhar Pond, where in the Rajput tradition, the Ranis committed mass sati after their consorts had been defeated in battle. At Man Mandir Palace, a poignant ambience of those days of chivalry and heroism still lingers in the silent chambers. A superbly mounted Son-et-Lumiere here brings it all alive every evening.

Ghaus Mohammed's Tomb :
The sandstone mausoleum of the Afghan prince, Ghaus Mohammed, is also designed on early Mughal lines. Particularly exquisite are the screens which use the pierced stone technique as delicate as lace. It is on the way to Gwalior fort near Hazira from Railway Station.

Man Mandir Palace :
Built between 1486 and 1517 by Raja Mansingh. The tiles that once adorned its exterior have not survived , but at the entrance , traces of these still remain. Within the palace rooms stand bare , stripped of their former glory, testifying to the passing of the centuries. Vast chambers with fine stone screens were once the music halls, and behind these screens, the royal ladies would learn music from the great masters of the day. Below, circular dungeons housed the state prisoners of the Mughals. Emperor Aurangzeb had his brother , Murad imprisoned , and later executed here. Close by is Jauhar Pond, where in the Rajpit tradition, the ranis committed mass sati after their consorts had been defeated in battle. At Man Mandir Palace, a poignant ambience of those days of chivalry and heroism still lingers in the silent chambers. A superbly mounted Son-et-Lumiere here brings it all alive every evening.

Gurudwara Data Bandhi Chhod :
Built in the memory of Guru Hargobind Saheb , the 6th Sikh Guru who was imprisoned here by Emperor Jehangir for over two years. It is located on the Gwalior Fort.

Distance from Railway Station / Bus Stand : 6.00 Kms Approx.

Gopachal :
Gopachal Parvat - situated on the Mountain Area at slopes of Gwalior Fort carries unique statue of Jain Tirthankars. The largest Idol of Bhagwan Parshwanath on Lotus is the largest statue(in single stone piece) in the world, being 47 feet high and 30 feet in width. 26 Jain statues in a series give a beautiful and attractivce picturescue. Built between 1398 to 1536 by Tomar Kings - these Jain Tirthankars Statues are a species of Architecture and a treasure of Old Indian heritage and culture. Distance from Railway Station / Bus Stand : 2.00 Kms Approx.

Sun Temple :
Located near the Residency at Morar, the newly constructed Sun Temple takes its inspiration from the famous Konark Sun Temple in Orissa.

Distance from Railway Station / Bus Stand : 5.00 Kms. Approx.

Sarod Ghar :
This Museum of Music has been set up in the old ancestral house of the legendary Ustad Hafiz Ali Khan. It houses ancient instruments of the great Indian Masters of yesteryears.It also houses an impressive collection of photographs and documents.

Sarod Ghar is a unique institution devoted to promoting Indian classical music, heritage and culture.Through this 'window' to the past , music lovers can gain a better understanding of the evolution and history of our classical music and a deeper perspective and insight into the context of the art as it exists today.

Ustad Hafiz Ali Khan Memorial Trust, Hafiz Ali Khan Road, Jiwaji Ganj, Lashkar, Gwalior - 474001

Timings : 10.00 AM to 5:00 PM (Lunch time : 1:30 PM to 2.00 PM)

Distance from Railway Station / Bus Stand : 5-6 Kms. Approx.

Jai Vilas Palace and Museum :

A splendor of a different kind exists in the Jai Vilas Palace, current residence of the Scindia family. Some 25 rooms have been turned into the Jivaji Rao Scindia Museum, and in these rooms , so evocative of a regal lifestyle, the past comes alive. Jai Vilas is an Italianate structure which combines the Tuscan and Corinthian architectural modes. The imposing Darbar Hall has two central chandeliers weighing a couple of tonnes, and hung only after ten elephants had tested the strength of the roof. Ceilings picked out in gilt, heavy draperies and tapestries , fine Persian carpets and antique furniture from France and Italy are the features of these spacious rooms. Eye catching treasures include : a silver train with cutglass wagons which served guests as it chugged around the table on miniature rails; a glass cradle from Italy used for the baby Krishna each Janmashtami, silver dinner services and swords that were once worn by Aurangzeb and Shah Jahan. These are, besides, personal momentoes of past members of the Scindia family : the jeweled slippers that belonged to Chinkoo Rani , four-poster beds, gifts from practically every country in the world, hunting trophies and portraits. The Scindia Museum offers an unparalled glimpse into the rich culture and lifestyle of princely India.

Timings : 10.00 AM to 5:00 PM : Wensday Closed

Distance from Railway Station / Bus Stand : 1.5 -2 Kms. Approx.

Events in Gwalior, Madhya Pradesh

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